Did The Floyd Mayweather/Conor McGregor Fight Live Up to the Hype?

 

Mayweather-vs-McGregor
Mayweather-vs-McGregor

The MayMac fight in Las Vegas was big, but there have been bigger, right? Ali vs. Frazier, the Rumble in the Jungle (Ali vs. Foreman), all of Sugar Ray Leonard’s  fights and all of the Roberto Duran fights and all of the Joe Louis fights lived up to the hype (mostly). But did this one? You tell me.

First of all, Connor McGregor lost because he doesn’t fight with boxing gloves. It’s a small thing but it’s a big deal. He’s an Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) fighter that fights without shoes and with light gloves (4-6 ounces) that allow fingers to grab.  None of that was happening with Mayweather.

Think about it. Mayweather was smart enough not to fight a UFC fight with McGregor. Right? Would the outcome have gone another way had it been a UFC fight?  You tell me.

McGregor is used to a different style and different rules. While he is the reigning UFC Lightweight Champion, and a former UFC Featherweight Champion with a mixed martial arts (MMA) background, he had a learning curve to overcome. So he came in with a decided disadvantage.  Did he overwhelm or overpower or override all of that? Not quite.

Second, Mayweather won and finished his career going 50-0, which is no small feat. But he’s a defensive, “pretty boy” fighter. His MO, modus operandi, is not to get hit, to outlast his opponents, and to capitalize off of their weaknesses.  Well, check all of the boxes, because once again, Mayweather managed to avoid getting hit (for the most part), he outlasted McGregor, and he capitalized on McGregor’s weakness of wearing out and burning out in the early rounds.

Finally, McGregor’s manager said that he was OK with the stoppage in the 10th Round. The TKO was called essentially because Conor was cornered, out of gas, and was running on fumes.  But did the fight live up to the hype? You tell me.

The real question is this: are you living up to the hype? Does your life and your lifestyle as a believer in the Ultimate God living up to the billing that the Bible says it should? The Bible says that we are more than conquerors through Him that loved us. The Bible says that God always gives us a triumphant win. The Bible says that we will overcome every foe by the blood of the Lamb and by the message that we preach.

Christians believe and preach that Jesus Christ is the Son of God. Our belief is rooted in and grounded on the faith that our lives should be fuller and richer and deeper and stronger than those who don’t believe.  But many of us are losing the fight in a technical knockout because we’re running out of gas; we aren’t fighting this fight of faith like we should. 

So, is your fight with this wanton world and your flimsy flesh and the diabolical devil a victory for you or not?

You tell me.

Mayweather vs. Pacquiao: Getting Ready for The Big Fight

mayweather-vs-pacquiao-news-video-official-2015-05-02
I grew up with Muhammad Ali and “Smokin” Joe Frazier and George Foreman (the fighter, not the grill). Then there was Larry Homes and “Marvelous” Marvin Hagler and Oscar de la Hoya and Evander Holyfield and Tommy “Hit Man” Hears and of course, “Iron Mike” Tyson. But that was then, and this is now. And this very well may be the fight of this fifteen year old Century.

Mayweather v. Pacquiao may well be the fight to end all fights – until the next big fight. It’s been a long time since there’s been a fight of this magnitude. Will it live up to the hype? Will it live down through the ages? Will it be worth the $100 pay-per-view price? I won’t know because it won’t start till way past my bedtime. But this much is true: big fights don’t come around every day, and big fights are big in every way.

Mayweather v. Pacquiao may well be bigger than anything that you face in your life every day. And maybe not. Maybe you have big fights and big games and big races and big heats and big matches and big Game 7’s in your life all of the time. God bless you. Because it takes something to get “up” for the big one.

When it comes to the big fights in your life, it’s all about how you approach them. It’s all about your tactics and your techniques and your practices and your preparation. Because how you go in pretty much dictates how you will come out. If you don’t have an edge and an aura and tact and a tone and the dexterity and the delicacy to bob and weave and duck and dodge and juke and jab and as you fight in the ring of life, you’ve lost before you’ve even won.

In the big fight of life, you can’t have a glass jaw. You can’t just stand there like a statue and get knocked in the nose and hammered in the head and gorged in the gut. You’ve gotta’ fight back. You’ve gotta’ fight fierce. You’ve gotta’ scrap and scrape and battle and brawl and get through every round until it’s all over. You may be sucker punched and rabbit punched and left punch drunk before you are saved by the bell.

So who ya got? I don’t know the fighters well enough to call this one. But the pundits are predicting a whale of a fight. So go ahead. Pay your 100 bucks and tell me how it was. And make sure that you’re ready for your next big fight too.

Don’t Hate The Player, Hate The Game

MayweatherMarquezFinalLVPC_Hoganphotos-3

Any fight fans out there?  I’m not, but as the saying goes, “don’t hate the player, hate the game.” Playa Hater is live in Las Vegas for the Floyd Mayweather-Juan Manuel Marquez fight on Saturday night, October 13, 2014 at the MGM Grand. The rapper Ice T wrote these lyrics: “I don’t know why a player wanna hate T.  I didn’t choose the game, the game chose me.”

Don’t hate the player, hate the game is another way of saying “don’t blame me; this is how the system works.” In other words, “society made me do it,” or “the system is flawed and I’ve figured out how to work it,”or “everyone else is cheating too.”

This, of course is a cop out.  To say, don’t dislike someone for their actions, consider instead the situation that causes it, is only half of the story. It’s a twist of Gandhi’s Quote: “Hate the sin and love the sinner.”  

In order to “hate the game,” individual culpability is thrown out the window, and we are somehow to believe it when athletes gone astray say “it’s not my fault that I’m the way that I am.”  Hogwash.

The most popular usage of “Don’t hate the playa, hate the game” (DHTPHTG) is when one employs extra-scrupulous tactics to vanquish an enemy in the fields of:

Business;

Dating;

Politics, and especially Sports.

Hate is the opposite of love, and the best use of hate is for sin and shame, and for the emblems of evil that pervade our society.  Our hate should not be for the institutions of football and baseball and basketball and professional sports in general. Rather, our hate should be, as the Bible implies and as Gandhi implores, for the sin and not for the sinner.

It seems that we have lost our way when we don’t play clean and hard and fair; when we don’t reward the right ones and we reward everyone; and when we excuse those who strain at a gnat and swallow a camel.  We need to return to good old fashioned morals and manners, principles and practices, and these need to be employed on and off of the court and the field, and in tonight’s case, the boxing ring.