“As Brazil Crashes Out, the Magic Appears to Be Gone, Too”

Brazil Loss in 2018 FIFA

Here’s an absoultely brilliantly written piece by By 

KAZAN, Russia — It is a fine line between respect and deference, and in the days before they came face to face with Brazil, Belgium’s players and staff did all they could to navigate it.

A World Cup quarterfinal against Brazil was a challenge, defender Vincent Kompany said, but he and his teammates would not be “losing sleep” over the identity of their opponents. There was “no weakness” in Brazil’s team, according to striker Romelu Lukaku, although “defensively, they can be taken” on.

Belgium’s coach, Roberto Martínez, would concede only one advantage to his opponent before his team beat Brazil, 2-1, on Friday. “The difference is, we have not won the World Cup, and they have won it five times,” he said. “Brazil has got that psychological barrier out of the way.”

That weight of history, of course, is what lends Brazil its magic. It is what makes Brazil the world’s most prestigious national team, a byword not just for taste and style but for success, too. That ultimate marriage of style and substance is what makes the sight of those canary yellow jerseys, blue shorts and white socks so enchanting, what makes the colors gleam just a little brighter.

To see them is to remember Pelé and Jairzinho, Romário and Ronaldo, all of the single-name stars who emerged, every four years, to light up a tournament and so many childhoods. It is to recall the goals they scored and the World Cups they won, the stories of their indelible greatness the world was told when it was young.

It is the same whether you are a fan or a player: Brazil is different; Brazil is special. Martínez is quite right — that effect must count for something, at some level, however deep in the subconscious. It must bewitch those who find themselves tasked with stopping the thing that so inspired them.

And yet if those jerseys are intimidating to see, they are surely no less daunting to wear. All those greats, all those ghosts, on your shoulders and on your back, reminding you of what you are supposed to achieve, who you are supposed to be, that only victory counts as success and everything else is failure.

But Martínez was also quite wrong. Brazil might have won five World Cups, but this Brazil team — this Brazil generation — has not won any, and it will be painfully, crushingly aware of it.

There are five stars on Brazil’s jersey representing those championships, but the last one was added in 2002. After this defeat, the soonest a sixth can join it is in 2022, a wait of two long decades for a nation that — for all the romance of jogo bonito — values only victory. This team, like the three that have gone before it, has failed.

There has not even been a succession of near misses. Brazil fell in the quarterfinals in 2006 and 2010, just as it has in Russia. It went one step further on home soil in 2014, but found only humiliation, the sort that can scar a nation, waiting there.

Every time, the rhythm of the country’s reaction has been the same. There is a bout of soul-searching; the manager is sacked; a new coach promises to make the team more resilient, more tenacious. He does this by playing with more defensive midfielders. It does not work. The cycle begins again.

This time, it is even harder to believe such a response would be proportionate. Brazil was not embarrassed by Belgium: Tite’s team created more than enough chances to have forced extra time, at the very least. It can regard itself unfortunate not to have been awarded a penalty for a foul on Gabriel Jesus. It can believe itself cursed that, in the first half in particular, Belgium defended so effectively by accident, rather than by design.

Not every defeat is proof of some spiritual failing. Not every defeat means everything is wrong. Certainly, there is no shortage of talent on this Brazilian squad, just as there was no shortage of talent in any of the squads since 2002. Neymar is not a mirage, and neither are Jesus, Philippe Coutinho, Douglas Costa and the others.

There are some aging legs in the back line, and something of a dearth of young, dynamic fullbacks, but this is a country that exports thousands of players every year. It is a place where players will continue to grow.

That is what has allowed Brazil to build its history, that endless flowering of talent, one star replaced smoothly by another, year after year, cycle after cycle, decade after decade.

What has happened since 2002, though, suggests this is no longer the advantage it once was. The playing field has been leveled: Brazil is no longer pre-eminent in the way it once was, possessed of enough raw brilliance to carry it through. The explanation for that does not lie in Brazil’s shortcomings, but in someone else’s strengths.

It is not a coincidence that all four of this year’s World Cup semifinalists, whatever happens in the second set of quarterfinals, are from Europe. This is, increasingly, a European competition. All four of the most recent world champions have been European. Since 1990, what might be broadly termed soccer’s modern era, there have been eight World Cups. Brazil has won two. Europe will have picked up the rest.

At least one manager here has confided privately that Europe’s power — in terms of finance, influence, and physicality — has become almost impossible to compete with, certainly for Africa, Asia and North America, and increasingly for South America, the game’s other traditional stronghold.

The major nations of the Old World have industrialized youth development so effectively that France, Germany and Spain can now rival Brazil and Argentina as a source of players. Its smaller countries have such easy access to best practices that their size is no longer an issue.

Their players and coaches can be exported easily to the best leagues in the world. The latest developments in coaching, sports science, nutrition and the rest can be imported rapidly. It is that process that allowed Iceland to draw with Argentina, and be a little disappointed it did not win. It is that process that has left Belgium in the World Cup semifinals, and Croatia and Sweden with hopes of joining them.

And it is that process that has seen Brazil come and go from four World Cups, all without success. Each one, each failing, simply adds to the pressure that awaits the next team to try to end the wait, to try to overcome all of the advantages that Europe can call on.

The players in those yellow jerseys know as well as anyone that Brazil has won five World Cups. They know more than everyone that they have not contributed to any of them. Increasingly, those victories are not a psychological barrier that lies broken at their feet, but one that towers above them, standing in their way, casting them into shadow.

Belgium Beat Brazil? YES!

Belgium Defeats Brazil In a stunner, Belgium defeated heavily favored Brazil and advanced to the “Final Four” of the 2018 FIFA World Cup. And I watched in absolute horror as Brazil out shot Belgium 27 – 10 and still lost. Shots on goal sailed high and went wide as one scoring opportunity after another went by the wayside.  Brazil had their chances, but still couldn’t get it done. The Boys from Brazil outplayed, out passed but couldn’t outscore the brothers from Belgium, and it was a sight to see. 

And herein is the 2018 World Cup life lesson: sometimes the favorite does not win, and sometimes the best team is not the better team.  And sometimes there will be an upset, not a comeback.

Four years ago Brazil lost AT HOME in the 2014 World Cup to Germany 7-1, and that was a gut wrencher. I saw that match too (ya gotta know which games you just HAVE TO watch). This time out, the Boys from Brazil, namely Neymar and company, were supposed to avenge the blood of their 2014 brothers, but the Russian soccer gods would have none of it. Yes this game is spiritual. How else can you explain the Brazilians missing shot after shot on goal, and then the Belgium’s, with just five measly shots on goal, winning the game with two goals, one of which was an own goal.

This is why we love sports. This is why we learn life lessons from the games. And this is why we believe in upsets, comebacks and turnarounds. I TOLD you to watch this one! So much for the commentary; here’s the play by play from Rob Harris, NBC Chicago:

“Belgium reached the World Cup semifinals for the first time in 32 years by holding off five-time champion Brazil 2-1 Friday, sending Neymar home without living up to the expectations of being soccer’s most expensive player. Belgium scored the decisive goal on a counterattack just after a corner had been taken by Neymar. Romelu Lukaku surged forward with the ball and Kevin De Bruyne put it in the net to give Belgium a 2-0 lead in the 31st minute.

‘This was the biggest test for us,’ De Bruyne said. ‘Brazil was so strong in attack.’

The opener came after a bit of good fortune. Fernandinho’s trailing arm inadvertently helped Belgium captain Vincent Kompany’s header land in his own net in the 13th minute.

As Belgium lost cohesiveness in the second half and Brazil’s changes stirred the team, substitute Renato Augusto reduced the deficit in the 76th with a header.  But it was too late for Brazil to muster an equalizer as efforts to force the game into extra time were thwarted by Belgium goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois.

For the third time in a World Cup — after 1982 and 2006 — the semifinals will feature only European teams. Belgium and France will meet in St. Petersburg on Tuesday. The next day in Moscow, it will be either England or Sweden against either Russia or Croatia. The other two quarterfinal matches will be played Sunday.”

So who do we route for now? Go Croatia!

All Eyes Are On Kentucky!

Coach-John-Calipari-Don’t bet against Kentucky; don’t do it. Don’t wager the farm or mortgage the barn betting on them to lose. Don’t do it. But then again, if you’re betting on them to win, figuratively, of course, that’s not a bad gamble to take. Coach Calipari is pointing the way and his band of basketball bandits simply need to take heed to make hay.

Kentucky is long and lean, but they like to preen, and so their only weakness is their lack of meekness. Kentucky has a point to prove and a goal to get and that’s the National Championship and the undefeated season that goes with it. They want to everyone to see just how good they are, and indeed can be.

Kentucky is deep and dynamic, formidable and seemingly indomitable. They are the overwhelming favorite and the designated darling; deservedly, they are definitely and without a doubt the obvious front-runner to win it all. But can it happen? Yes. Will it happen? Perhaps and maybe and probably and they might as well. This Kentucky team is so seriously good, it’s not even funny. They are far and away the best team in college basketball. They just have to prove it by winning it all.

But nothing is certain in March. Not the weather or even the winner of any college basketball game played in the season of unpredictable temperatures and unforeseeable tendencies. Teams that seem to play only half of the way and barely make the tournament play lights out in March. Teams with no chance to go even some of the way and no business going any of the way have a knack for going almost or even all the way as they knock off favorites and bust up brackets.

But teams that win in spite of the madness will weather the winds and winter the waves and matriculate through the maze that has no clear path to the end or the other side. If Kentucky can navigate and negotiate their ship through the Sargasso-like Sea of curious currents and land their ship ashore without the hull breaking up, then they do indeed belong in basketball lore forevermore.

So here’s to John Vincent Calipari and his young team of heady, hearty, history makers. Every eye is on you. Go Cats!