Note to Vonte Davis: “Don’t Quit Halfway Through”

 

Vontae Davis
Vontae Davis Walks Out and Walks Away

Vontae Davis quit halfway through.  That’s right. A PROFESSIONAL NFL football player actually played one half of a game, took a look around him, and realized how bad the situation was, and, instead of pledging to help make it better, he quit. Forget this retirement rhetoric; that’s garbage. Dude quit.  Vontae Davis called it quits at halftime, when his Bills were losing 28-6 to the Chargers.  The final score was 31 – 20.

For the first time in NFL history, a player, namely the Buffalo Bills’ cornerback Vontae Davis, called it a career and retired at halftime. With the Bills looking like the worst team in the NFL, per CBS Sports, this sudden change to the team’s roster is unlikely to make things better.  

The veteran defensive back  pulled the most incredible exit in NFL history yesterday when he decided at halftime that he was calling it a career. He pulled himself out of the game,  put on his street clothes, walked out of the stadium and decided to retire, right there. This is one of the Bills’ starting cornerbacks!  The 30-year-old cornerback, a first-round pick in 2009, spent a majority of his NFL career with the Indianapolis Colts. He played in 121 games and finishes his career with 22 interceptions and 98 pass deflections. 

So let’s analyze the situation for a minute: Yes the Bills stink. In the season opener on Sunday, September 9, 2018, the Baltimore Ravens dominated the game and slaughtered the Bills with a final score of 47 to 3.  That’s beyond bad. And no, you don’t get better in an instant. But yes, the Bills were a playoff team last year. But no, you don’t quit halfway through. It’s that simple. It’s like cheating, or accusing someone of cheating that isn’t cheating. You don’t. You just don’t. 

Davis said later that he came to the realization during the first half that he didn’t belong on an NFL football field any longer and that he should just retire. (Buffalo was down 28–6, so maybe a few other players should have had the same epiphany.) He said he didn’t mean to disrespect his teammates but they clearly still felt disrespected.

But don’t we teach our children not to give up and not to give in? Don’t we teach our boys and girls to be team players and not to be selfish? Aren’t we supposed to model before the next generation how to gut it out and suck it up? 

Incredibly, some are defending Davis for what he did. Why? Because this is a me first generation. This is an “I before we, me before you” and everybody else society that doesn’t give a hoot about how their actions affect anyone else.  And it’s said. It’s all so, so said.

 Here’s what Mr. Davis had to say for himself:

“This isn’t how I pictured retiring from the NFL,” Davis said, via NFL network. “But in my 10th NFL season, I have been doing what my body has been programmed to do: get ready to play on game day. I’ve endured multiple surgeries and played through many different injuries throughout my career and, over the last few weeks, this was the latest physical challenge.”

“I meant no disrespect to my teammates and coaches. But I hold myself to a standard. Mentally, I always expect myself to play at a high level,” Davis said, via NFL network. “But physically, I know today that isn’t possible and I had an honest moment with myself. While I was on the field, I just didn’t feel right, and I told the coaches, ‘I’m not feeling myself’.”

So you quit at halftime? Seriously?  He signed a one year deal with the Bills who weren’t that bad last year. But that was then, and this is now.  We’ve all learned that decisions should not be made on a whim or in the heat of the moment. Davis’s snap decision in the “now” moment certainly could be rethought or, even rescinded. But based on his statement, it doesn’t look like that will be the case. 

Mr. Davis went out and he put a bad taste in a lot of fans and players mouths.  And that’s just not how one should want to be remembered.

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Aaron Rodgers Does It Again!

Aaron Rodgers. No. 12
Aaron Rodgers Leads Epic Comeback Against the Chicago Bears, 24-23, On Sunday Night, September 9, 2018

Aaron Rodgers did it again. 

That’s right folks, Aaron Rodgers, the king of comebacks, pulled off yet another one on national TV against the Packer’s bitter rival, the Chicago Bears.  No one thought he had it in ’em. No one thought it could happen. No one, except Aaron Rodgers.

Which leads us directly to our point.   You can make it! You can absolutely comeback from way back and win, even with a bum knee. It doesn’t matter how banged up or beat up you are, you can overcome any and every obstacle to reach the top.  But you must have faith. You must have hope. And you must believe that all things are possible to him that believeth. Doubt and fear are like oil and water; the just don’t mix. So when you’re feeling low and have nowhere to go, when your friends are few, and the finish fades from view, always remember Aaron Rodgers. He did it. Rodgers came from behind, AGAIN! And you can too.

Here’s how one sports writer put it:

“Aaron Rodgers can beat the Bears in the regular season. Aaron Rodgers can beat the Bears in the playoffs. And, as Sunday night proved, he can beat the Bears on one leg.

Rodgers rallied the Packers from a 20-0 second-half deficit less than an hour after being carted to the Lambeau Field locker room with an apparent knee injury. The two-time NFL MVP willed his team back from the dead, throwing three touchdown passes despite not being able to put much weight on his left leg in a 24-23 victory that will stand as one of the most memorable moments of his football career.

But for Chicago, it was just more of the same. Sunday’s win marked the sixth time Rodgers had engineered either a fourth-quarter comeback or a game-winning drive against the Bears. It was a familiar feeling 250 miles northeast of the Windy City, too. Rodgers has come back to beat the Detroit Lions an additional five times. Some of these epic comebacks have been for playoff spots. Others meant nothing more than pride. One doomed Detroit to the dumbest possible season.

So where does last night’s win rank on the scale of Rodgers comebacks against NFC North rivals (he’s 12-7 against the Vikings as a starter but none of those wins featured a game-winning fourth quarter drive)? It’s near the top with room to grow based on how the Packers play after Week 1.”  https://www.sbnation.com/nfl/2018/9/11/17841522/aaron-rodgers-comeback-wins-bears-lions-ranking

 

 

Note to Serena: Don’t Let The Ump Beat You On the Inside

Serena US Open 2018
Was Serena Williams treated differently than a man would have been treated for doing exactly what she did and saying exactly what she said?

Serena let her emotions get the best of her. In the US Open Women’s Final, Serena was offended and insulted and slighted; she was harmed and therefore she hurt and was unhappy and upset all at the same time. Ever been there? I’m there now. But thank God there’s a way out of the darkness of defeat.

The remedy for pain is praise. The remedy for hurt is to sing hallelujah. The remedy for sorrow is to shout for joy. Only God can give beauty for ashes, and the oil of joy for morning and the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness.

I’m proud of how Serena stood up for herself. She was affronted, but she stood her ground and did not back down. Even though it cost her the match and millions of dollars, in the end she won the admiration and adoration of loyal fans the word over. She was wronged, and, in an effort to clear her name, she took a loss, and a worthy opponent got the win.

In other words, Serena won on the inside. Outside she was heated and it caused her to be hampered. She was upset, but that’s ok.

She won anyway.

Nike and Kaepernick: “Just Do It?”

Kaepernick Nike Commercial
Nike’s 30th Anniversary “Just Do It” Commercial Featuring Colin Kaepernick

By Paige Gawley‍, Entertainment Tonight

“Colin Kaepernick’s Nike commercial is here!

Following the controversial announcement that the 30-year-old NFL free agent would team with the sports brand earlier this week, the company has released a two-minute commercial featuring the athlete.

The uplifting ad includes people of all types — disabled and able-bodied; girls and guys; kids and adults — trying to accomplish something. Though they don’t always succeed, they always keep trying.

‘If people say your dreams are crazy, if they laugh at what you think you can do, good. Stay that way,’ Kaepernick says in a voiceover. ‘Because what non-believers fail to understand is that calling a dream crazy is not an insult. It’s a compliment.’

The ad continues with specific ways to dream big.

‘Don’t try to be the fastest runner in your school or the fastest in the world. Be the fastest ever,’ Kaepernick declares. ‘Don’t picture yourself wearing OBJ’s jersey. Picture OBJ wearing yours. Don’t settle for homecoming queen or linebacker. Do both. Lose 120 pounds and become an iron man, after beating a brain tumor. Don’t believe you have to be like anybody to be somebody. ‘

The Nike commercial also features clips of famous athletes doing their thing.

First it’s Alphonso Davies, a teenage refugee from Liberia, who plays soccer for Canada. ‘If you’re born a refugee, don’t let it stop you from playing soccer for the national team — at age 16,’ Kaepernick says.

‘Don’t become the best basketball player on the planet. Be bigger than basketball,’ the footballer player says alongside video of LeBron James opening his I Promise School school in Ohio.

The ad flashes to Kaepernick, who declares, ‘Believe in something, even if it means sacrificing everything.’ The statement references the fact that Kaepernick hasn’t been signed by an NFL team since 2016 when he was one of the first NFL players to kneel during the national anthem as a way of protesting police brutality and racial injustice in America.

‘When they talk about the greatest team in the history of the sport, make sure it’s your team,’ Kaepernick says of the U.S. National Soccer Team.

Shaquem Griffin, an NFL player with one hand, is featured next. ‘If you have only one hand, don’t just watch football, play it. At the highest level,‘Kaepernick says, ‘and if you’re a girl from Compton, don’t just become a tennis player. Dream of being the greatest athlete ever,” Kaepernick says of Serena Williams. ‘Yeah, that’s more like it.’

The ad ends with Kaepernick telling viewers, ‘So don’t ask if your dreams are crazy, ask if they’re crazy enough.’

When news of Kaepernick’s new gig broke on Monday, there were strong reactions from both sides. Musician John Rich was against the ad, while the NFL and celebrities including Kobe Bryant, Common and LeBron James came out in support.”

So, what say you?  Is Nike exploiting Colin Kaepernick, or is Kaepernick just exploiting his situation?  Take your pick. Either way, if you can stand back and be objective, you will certainly conclude that there is more  meat than bones in this mesmerizing message.

 

Motivation for Moving Forward — Can The Eagles Repeat? (A.K.A., When Will Wentz Be Back?)

 

Eagles Super Bowl Banner
Eagles’ Super Bowl LII Banner

 

That’s the question.  But actually, that’s not the real question. The real question is this: do the Eagles have the gumption and the gusto, the moxie and the mettle to repeat as Super Bowl Champions? And the answer is absolutely, unequivocally, undeniably yes.  The Eagles certainly CAN repeat. And since one good question always deserves another, the “B” part of this multiple choice test is this: WILL they repeat? Will the Eagles put it all together and win it all again? Will this dream team come together and will they keep it together so that it all stays together like last year’s magical season to produce back to back Super Bowl victories?  

Or will it all fall apart?

Carson Wentz will be back. Soon. Thank God. As much as we love and adore our beloved Nick Foles, Wentz has got to come back, ASAP. Yes we’re thankful to Nick for stepping in and stepping up and leading the charge up the playoff hill to the Super Bowl Summit. But in our heart of hearts we know that Nick is, and always will be, dare I say, “just a backup?” I know that sounds cold and cruel, but we have to face the fact that Nick played over his head in the playoffs last year — and we love him for it. But Wentz is the man. Wentz is our guy.

Truth be told, in the pre-season, Foles looked bad, really bad.  (And as Jack Nicholson once said “You can’t handle the Truth!) But we must. Foles did just enough in the season opener to save himself and his team from an opening night nightmare. If it wasn’t for the infamous Eagle “D,” we may well have lost to the pitiful looking Atlanta Falcons AT HOME on the night we raised, or unveiled, our Super Bowl banner. (I like seeing a banner raised, don’t you?) 

Here’s what one sports writer had to say about the Eagles/Falcons season opener:

“Let the record show that if it wasn’t for Philadelphia’s defense stepping up their game when the team needed it the most, chances are Atlanta would have won this game in a big way, and it wouldn’t have even been close. Whether it was preventing the Falcons from scoring on a goal-line stand during the first drive of the game to holding them to 12 points in general, the Eagles’ defense showed early signs of being a top unit once again during the 2018 season.

When looking at all of the weapons Matt Ryan has to work with from Julio Jones to Devonta Freeman, the Falcons never make it easy for any opponent. And even though Jones ended up getting his 10 catches for 169 yards to lead all receivers in the game, at least the Eagles were able to keep him out of the end zone, including times when it mattered the most towards the end of the game.

The fact that Atlanta only recorded one touchdown the entire game despite numerous opportunities deep in Philadelphia territory shows how special of a unit Jim Schwartz has on this team. By showing they can keep a high-powered offense in the Falcons in check, the Eagles’ defense will use this as motivation moving forward.” https://section215.com/2018/09/07/philadelphia-eagles-4-takeaways-from-win-over-atlanta-falcons-week-1/

 And that’s the message: we all need motivation for moving forward. 

And so the question for you and me is this: can we use the triumphs of yesterday as motivation for moving forward? Can we repeat the achievements and accomplishments of yesterday and move forward to notch more victories today and tomorrow? We certainly can, but as with the Eagles, the question is not can we, but will we?

Do we have the will to forge a way forward against the odds? Do we have the will to endure hardness, as good soldiers? Do we have the will to believe God for new mercies? And do we have the wherewithal to weather the howling wintery winds of life and the sometimes cold, cutting comments of friends and foes alike? Do we have what it takes to withstand the onslaught of the enemy and to continue to fight the good fight of faith? With the help of Heaven we can.

And by God’s grace we will.

 

Sports and John McCain: “Exploring John McCain’s Profound Impact On The Sports World”

John McCain Hand Over Heart
John McCain Hand Over Heart

By Larry Brown

http://larrybrownsports.com/baseball/john-mccain-profound-impact-sports-world/461521

“Senator John McCain died on Saturday, August 25, 2018 at the age of 81 after succumbing to brain cancer. The longtime Arizona state senator was best known for running for president against Barack Obama in 2008 and for being a Vietnam War hero who survived despite being tortured as a P.O.W. McCain was also a big sports fan who had a profound impact on the sports world during his time in congress. That is the part of his legacy that we would like to explore.

During his political career, McCain had a big hand in the reformation of baseball, boxing, and the UFC, as well as other sports. Matching his conservative ideology, McCain often focused on more fairness and rules to protect athletes.

BASEBALL

McCain was one of the big reasons why MLB introduced a drug testing program that helped end the steroids era in the sport.

Even though the use of steroids was illegal in the country, MLB’s drug testing was extremely lax (just one test per year), with light penalties. That led to the game being overridden by steroids users for around a decade between the early 1990s to the early 2000s. In order to get the sport to clean up the drug use, McCain, acting in his role as Senate Commerce Committee Chairman, threatened federal legislation if MLB did not introduce a harsher drug policy.

“Major league baseball players and owners should meet immediately to enact the standards that apply to the minor leagues, and if they don’t, I will have to introduce legislation that says professional sports will have minimum standards for testing,” McCain said in Dec. 2004. “I’ll give them until January, and then I’ll introduce legislation.”

In 2006, MLB introduced its Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. The program included more comprehensive testing as well as significantly harsher penalties to discourage cheating.

His big reason for pushing for harder drug testing? “What I care about are high school athletes who are tempted to use steroids because they think that’s the only way they can make it in the major leagues,” McCain said in a 2004 ESPN article on the matter.

McCain also supported bills that pushed for Shoeless Joe Jackson to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame and legislation to honor Jackie Robinson.

BOXING

McCain was a lightweight boxer and huge fan of the sport. He also worked hard to help improve the sport with regulations aimed at protecting fighters medically and from financial exploitation.

In 1996, his Professional Boxing Safety Act bill was passed. The bill mandated all boxing matches be supervised by a state athletic commission; fighters be physically tested before being medically cleared to fight; health insurance coverage for each fighter; and the presence of an ambulance and medical personnel at each fight.

As positive as those changes were, he made even more contributions later with the passing of the Muhammad Ali Boxing Reform Act. The Ali Act, which came into law in 2000, sought to prevent fighters from being exploited. The act mandated a separation between promoters and managers so that a fighter’s best interest would be represented. The act sought to end widespread corruption in the sport.

“If we can pass this legislation, there’s some hope,” McCain said in an ESPN article by Tim Graham before the legislation was passed. “I believe that boxers are the most exploited of all professional athletes. They come from the lowest economic rung, and they generally are the least educated, and they’re in the only major sport that’s not unionized.”

UFC

McCain was not a fan of the UFC, which he compared to “human cockfighting” back in 1997. He was one of the biggest enemies of the organization, which began without weight classes or rules, notoriously holding an “anything goes” attitude. McCain’s criticism and issues with the UFC led to it being pulled from pay-per-view and banned in every state around 20 years ago.
The UFC began to clean up the sport little by little, introducing rules and regulations, and seeking legalization state by state. In 2014, UFC owner Lorenzo Fertitta credited McCain’s toughness for helping the league gain legitimacy.

“I have to give him credit,” Fertitta said. “Without him doing what he did back in the ’90s to force regulation, this sport would be dead. It wouldn’t exist. Honestly, for all the negatives he caused, he actually allowed the sport to foster and grow.”

McCain’s influence on sports doesn’t end there. During his political career, he sought to ban gambling on college sports. More recently, he sought to end government spending on military recognition at sports events, which many thought were done out of patriotism rather than commercialism.

McCain was incredibly accomplished and worked hard to improve the sports world. His work in the sports arena has had a great effect and will continue to long after his death.”

John McCain

John McCain

John Sidney McCain III.  When it comes to the dearly, departed senator, this is all you have to say: John McCain. John Sidney McCain. He was a  Vietnam veteran, a war hero, a representative, a statesman, a loving husband, and a caring father.  In essence, McCain was an officer and a gentleman.  He won the hearts of Americans from sea to shinning sea by being honest and fair and genuine and gregarious.

John McCain stood for what’s right. And standing up for what’s right is the crux of sports and life.  When the Viet Cong found out that his father was a U.S. Navy Admiral, they offered to released him, on the condition that he denounce U.S. involvement in the war. He refused. McCain refused to be released by his captors and so he remained a P.O.W. for five years. Thus, when McCain was released from captivity and put together a memorable polictical career, he staged one of the greatest comebacks of all time.

While Vietnam is what McCain will mostly be remembered for, I laud him for something just as significant.  For me, McCain should be most remembered for recently standing up against the sitting, and his fellow republican, president who didn’t even have the decency or the common courtesy to pay tribute to this legend of a man.  

On a positive note, Meghan McCain gave an emotional tribute to her father. At the Memorial Service at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., she stood, and with a halting voice, spoke lovingly of her dad. Meghan McCain told the story of when she was young how she fell from a horse and broke her collar-bone.  McCain took his daughter to the doctor, got her patched up, and then, not much later, took her back to that same horse and made her ride again.

John McCain taught his daughter, and by extension he taught the rest of us, how to endure hardness. He taught us how to get back up and get back going.  He taught us how to endure hardness, as good soldiers. He taught us that getting knocked down is a part of life.  And he taught us that getting back up is the only way to win. To endure, to persevere, to fight and to stand up to foes and not stand down and not fear. That was John McCain.

Let’s all thank God for the example and legacy of John McCain.