Gold or Nothing

Canadian Hockey Loss
Jocelyne Larocque wanted no part of the silver medal following Canada’s 3-2 shootout loss to the U.S. in the women’s hockey final Thursday. (BRUCE BENNETT/GETTY IMAGES)

In the last four Winter Olympics, Canada’s women’s hockey team has taken the Gold medal home and they looked to extend that streak in South Korea. The Canadian women were the heavy favorites as they got set to take on the United States, but they were shocked when the Americans scored a game-tying goal in the third period and forced overtime. Neither team could score in the extra period, so a shootout was upon us.

Team USA eventually scored an epic goal in the 6th round of the shootout to stun Canada and win gold. Jocelyne Larocque, a 29-year-old Canadian defenseman, was understandably upset, so when the Silver Medal was placed around her neck following the game, she immediately removed it.

Here’s how one reporter told it:

“Jocelyne Larocque of the Canadian women’s hockey team was upset, to say the least, at her team’s loss to the United States. Larocque was so distraught that when the silver medal was placed around her neck, she ripped it off within seconds.” It was something that we should never want our teams or our teammates to do.

On the one hand, I applaud Larocque for wanting gold and not wanting silver. I do. It appears that Larocque was channeling the drive and the determination of the great ones such as Michael Jordan and Tom Brady and Derek Jeter and Wayne Gretzky; certainly that is admirable. We all wish we could be as good as these all-star athletes at something, especially our favorite sport.  

On the other hand, the way she publically portrayed her cold angst and callous anger over losing, and probably losing to the US no less, was not cool. The gold or nothing mentality is contrary to the spirit of the Olympics in general and the spirit of sport in specific.

“The rivalry between the Canadian and the United States women’s hockey teams is one of most intense in the Winter Olympic Games. Canada was victorious over the U.S. the last four Winter Olympics but the streak was finally broken this year when the U.S. came out on top. The American’s last victory over Canada came in 1998 in Nagano, Japan”. https://www.inquisitr.com/4798473/canadian-womens-hockey-player-refused-to-wear-silver-medal-at-ceremony-after-u-s-won-gold/Most of the tweets about Larocque’s display of dissatisfaction focused on her poor sportsmanship. The Canadians have owned the US Women the past four Winter Olympics.  That’s dominance. So, in Larocque’s mind, another win was expected. And an unexpected loss was not welcome.

So here we go again with the life lessons sports teach us. First, sports teach how to win with grace. Second, sports teach us how to lose graciously.  We need to learn both lessons, the positive and the negative. After all, it, it takes a positive and a negative charge for a battery to make an engine go.

Here are three quotes that sum it all up:

Winning is great, sure, but if you are really going to do something in life, the secret is learning how to lose. Nobody goes undefeated all the time. If you can pick up after a crushing defeat, and go on to win again, you are going to be a champion someday.          

 Wilma Rudolph

 

Winning is nice if you don’t lose your integrity in the process.         

 Arnold Horshak 

 

That’s what learning is, after all; not whether we lose the game, but how we lose and how we’ve changed because of it and what we take away from it that we never had before, to apply to other games. Losing (with grace), in a curious way, is winning.

Richard Bach

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